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The importance of having your digital ducks in a row

The importance of having your digital ducks in a row Rebecca Lieb

You don't need a lot of content to make a big impact.


Mere hours after Sen. Ted Cruz threw his hat into the ring and announced his candidacy for the highest office in the land, TedCruz.com went live. The site consists of one sober page, white text on a black background:



Unsurprisingly, social media lit up with (deservedly) derisive comments. The same would have been the case 10 years ago. Cruz is hardly the first politician to flop so spectacularly online. I can recall Rudy Giuliani's MySpace profile during his presidential bid -- the page was marked "private" so no one could see the posts.


But that was then. I don't think that today it's going too far to say that a candidate that doesn't have the foresight to secure his own name (not to mention any and all related domains) doesn't deserve my vote. It's bad decision-making. It's bad politics. It's bad content, image, spin, and PR. What would have been a big "oops" 10 or 15 years ago is now indicative of someone who (politics aside) is not making informed decisions.


Because today, digital is too important to ignore. Barack Obama owes his two terms not just to a platform that resonated with the electorate, but with one of the all-time greatest digital CRM campaigns. The White House has a chief digital officer now.


Contrast that with Cruz, who doesn't have a top-level domain in his name.


This choice, or oversight, or whatever you care to call it, speaks volumes about Ted Cruz as a leader. What kind of people has he brought on as campaign advisors if this critical element of his messaging has been completely overlooked? A president is only good as his lieutenants. It's hard to imagine a candidate who can't buy a web domain becoming the most powerful politician in the world and appointing a qualified cabinet.


My friend Vin Crosbie has pointed out that ICANN's Uniform Domain-Name Dispute-Resolution Policy (UDRP) could, in fact, return TedCruz.com to Ted Cruz, because the current owner is using it in bad faith. To do so, Cruz would have to file a complaint.
 
"I could get it for him by the end of the week," an SEO and reputation management expert commented on my Facebook page. "But he isn't going to ask."


It's going to be an interesting election season. Simply from a digital marketing perspective, I don't think the first candidate in the ring is going to be able to go the distance.


Rebecca Lieb is an analyst, digital advertising/media, for Altimeter Group.


On Twitter? Follow iMedia Connection at @iMediaTweet.

Rebecca Lieb has published more research on content marketing than anyone else in the field.  As a strategic adviser, her clients range from start-up to non-profits to Fortune 100 brands and regulated industries. She's worked with brands...

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