3 ways to uncover Twitter's media placement opportunities

Today's fragmented media landscape means it's becoming harder and harder for brands to reach a critical mass. Consumers are now divided across millions of different channels and hundreds of devices, which means the brands that are still trying to reach everyone with blanket media placements are in serious trouble.

But for marketers who are willing to dig in and get to know individual segments of their audience, the digital media landscape presents wonderful opportunities to make meaningful connections in less crowded environments. You probably already use Twitter as a vehicle for your brand messages, but you might not know how to tap into this social giant's research potential to identify targeted media placements for your audience.

Use public Twitter data for an analytic edge

Twitter is a rich source of free, up-to-date public information about your target consumers. This data can uncover narrowly targeted media placements that are more effective and less expensive.
 
Just use these three tactics to help you sort through the data:
 
Segment to find No. 2
The first and most important step to using Twitter for research is to segment your data. Even if you can't get fancy with algorithms and text analysis, segment for basic demographics like gender, age, location, and frequency of engagement.
 
When you've identified the most valuable segments, set aside your most engaged segment and look at your second most engaged segment. This may seem counterintuitive at first, but moving beyond the expected will allow you to identify media outlets that aren't receiving as much attention from advertisers.
 
Ignore overrepresented media in favor of segment saturation
Dig into your analytics tool, and determine which media is overrepresented by the personas you want to reach. Popular sites such as The Huffington Post, BuzzFeed, and ESPN will be overwhelmed with advertisements and probably out of your price range.
 
Instead, compare the ratios of your followers to a media source to the rest of Twitter's user base. Taking this extra step will help you find the media outlets with a higher saturation of your target audience (not just Twitter's total audience), which could unearth less popular blogs with a high concentration of your followers.
 
For example, if you were looking at media placements for the FIFA World Cup, hopefully you didn't get stuck on sports blogs. Your audience visits other places online, such as @FiveThirtyEight, or Nate Silver's blog. His account doesn't even hit the top 25 for @FIFAWorldCup in popularity, but for uniqueness, he's at No. 8. His blog is a nice outlet advertisers could use to extend their reach.
 
Identify what else is popular
Next, look at the other off-topic media outlets your target audience engages with. Identify the most popular media by counting the links your target personas share on Twitter. Which URLs and media outlets do your top engagers link to when they're not talking about you? This data can reveal media options you might not have considered.

How to ensure the right fit

Identifying possible media placements is only half the battle. When you've put together a list of possible media outlets, there are three questions you need to ask before moving forward.
 
Are you trying to extend your reach or defend your most loyal advocates?
Determine your goals for this promotion. If you're trying to defend your loyal advocates, you'll want to stick with media outlets that are comfortable for your audience. If you're trying to extend your reach, the personas you use become a little more flexible, and so do your media options. Customize your promotions and content accordingly.
 
Are you trying to win over your competitors' engagers?
Another value of persona-driven targeting is that you can sometimes win over competitors' engagers. If your competitors are behind the times, you can find their market and target them as you would your own.
 
In this case, go for their No. 2 segment again, which might be more likely to swing over to your brand without a fight. Just look at what Apple has done to Microsoft Windows. Apple started with its core audience of heavy graphic design users but quickly moved to users who weren't emotionally attached to Windows. Apple targeted them and increased its market share by more than 300 percent in just five years.
 
Can you match the tone of the targeted media?
Even after performing an analysis and finding unique and popular media for your targeted personas, you have to be able to match the tone of the publication for your efforts to be successful. If the tone of the publication doesn't match your brand truths, it's not a good match.
 
For instance, if your brand is straightforward and honest, you can't bend it to be snarky and sarcastic for the sake of a media placement like The Onion.
 
When you know your audience, there's no need to fear media fragmentation. With the right approach, you can put Twitter to work for you and identify a highly targeted media placement. You'll stand out by appearing in a less crowded environment, and you'll make an instant connection by associating your brand with media your target audience already loves.
 
Jack Holt is co-founder and CEO of Mattr.

On Twitter? Follow iMedia Connection at @iMediaTweet.

 

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